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Visualfy News 03/03/2017

General

FEES FOR SPANISH ID CARDS AND PASSPORTS CAN BE PAID ONLINE

Fees for a Spanish ID card or passport can now be paid online when booking an appointment (after 27 February). Payment can be made by transfer or credit card - if users have an active digital certificate.

The official website www.citapreviadni.esguides users step by step through the process of entering data and then users must identify themselves with a digital certificate. After entering the account or card number and connecting with the corresponding bank, users receive a payment receipt.


BELGIAN COMPANY WANTS TO IMPLANT ITS WORKERS WITH A CHIP

A Belgian company – NewFusion – had developed a microchip for implanting in its workers. The device is the size of a grain of rice and is implanted between the index finger and thumb. The aim is to ensure that workers can automatically open doors or access their computers.

A spokesman for the company said that the objective is not to imitate Big Brother, but to offer greater convenience for those employees who volunteer. Employees who do not want an implant may use a ring or a bracelet instead – or even continue using traditional plastic cards.

This microchip is controlled from a mobile app. It does not contain personal information and cannot be used to locate the worker because it has no GPS. The American-made device costs €100 and is inserted by syringe.

The company spokesman said that this type of device could be used in the future to replace passports, bank cards, and may even include health information to help medical staff if the individual is unconscious.


INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY

International Women's Day, also known as International Day of Working Women, is celebrated on 8 March as a tribute to the struggle of women for equality. It is a national holiday in some countries. The first celebration of International Working Women's Day took place on 19 March 1911 in Germany, Austria, Denmark, and Switzerland – and it has since extended to more countries. During the French Revolution in 1789, women for the first time became aware of their social situation, and together with men claimed equality under the motto ‘freedom, equality and fraternity’. That same year, in the Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, women's emancipation was proposed in terms of equality and the right to vote.

On 23 November 1909 the ‘shirtwaist’ strike began in New York. Most of the strikers were women, led by Clara Lemlich, and they demanded better conditions and fewer working hours. From the beginning, the strike was strongly opposed and during 11 weeks more than 30,000 strikers were locked up. In the confrontations, Clara Lemlich had six ribs broken and was stopped up to 17 times. Finally, the strike was suspended in February 1910. A month later, the 8 March was proclaimed as International Day of Working Women with the aim of fostering equal rights.

A fire at the Triangle shirt factory in New York on 25 March 1911 killed 123 women, 23 men, and injured another 71. The fire may have been caused by an improperly extinguished cigar in a cloth-filled bucket, or a malfunctioning sewing machine motor. Workers could not escape because the exits were closed to prevent theft.

Here in Spain, 8 March is special because on that day in 1910 women were given access to higher education on equal terms with men. By the end of the nineteenth century some Spanish women had already entered university, since there was no law prohibiting women from studying at university. It was not forbidden because legislators had not considered that a woman would want to study. As early as 1785, María Isidra de Guzmán obtained her doctorate at the University of Alcalá de Henares and in 1849 Concepción Arenal disguised herself as a man to study law at the University of Madrid. However, in 1882 a new order prohibited women from studying at university. It would not be until 8 March 1910, when Spanish women could enrol on equal terms. In contrast, Cambridge University did not admit women to all courses until 1947.

In conclusion, there are still many countries in which inequality is experienced and, therefore, the fight for equality must continue. From Visualfy we wish to honour the figure of women and celebrate International Women's Day.

See you next Tuesday.

Visualfy News 24/02/2017


THE GOVERNMENT SAYS THAT IT WILL NOT DELAY THE AGE OF RETIREMENT BEYOND 67

The Economy Minister, Luis de Guindos, confirmed last Saturday that the government will not delay the retirement age beyond 67.


Visualfy News 17/02/2017


THE IVI WILL SAY FREE TO THE VALENCIAN WOMEN HOW MANY FERTILE OVULS THEY HAVE

The Valencian Institute of Infertility (IVI) is going to start a free campaign to check how many fertile ovules have Valencian women between 25 and 38 years.


Visualfy News 10/02/2017


A NEW WIND TURBINE IS ABLE TO OFFER ELECTRICITY TO ONE HOUSE FOR 66 YEARS WITH ONLY ONE DAY OF PRODUCTION

Hello good afternoon…

The most powerful wind turbine in the world is called V164 and is located in the high seas area of Denmark.


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